Author Archives: marklangley

About marklangley

Academic Dean at The Lyceum (a school he founded in 2003, see theLyceum.org) Mark loves sacred music and Gregorian Chant and singing with his lovely wife, Stephanie, and their twelve children.

Three Ways We Should Read Sacred Scripture

In scene two of the third Act of Romeo and Juliet, Friar Laurence cautions Romeo, Wisely and Slow, they stumble that run fast. Now, even those who have not read the play can guess that Romeo probably did not take … Continue reading

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Two Reasons Why Things Are Difficult to Understand

As has been thoroughly set forth and expounded by the inimitable philosopher, the late great Duane Berquist, in a beautiful succinct and brilliant paper on this very subject, there are seven times when we need to go wisely and slow in … Continue reading

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The first two places we need to go “wisely and slow”(ly)

 I can tell when a topic is so fascinating that people are just not ready to move on. And you, O fortunate reader, are lucky that I have this gift! Many would have long since abandoned the interesting topic of … Continue reading

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Seven times to proceed wisely and slow

This past January 22, the philosopher Duane Berquist died. Among his many virtues, Duane Berquist had the distinction of being a wise man. Readers of lionandox.com might already be familiar with some of Dr. Berquist’s thought to the extent that … Continue reading

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Slow down, you move too fast!

The lazy hazy days of summer are here and I can’t think of more appropriate advice to give anyone than that which Friar Laurence gave to Romeo: ROMEO O, let us hence; I stand on sudden haste. FRIAR LAURENCE Wisely … Continue reading

Posted in Aquinas, Augustine, catholic education, education, liberal education, summer vacation, Wisdom | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Lord’s Prayer: What Does “Lead Us Not Into Temptation” Mean?

Well… I tried explaining this very thing back in 2017 but as a seasoned teacher, I know the importance of repetition. More than most, I know that, “Repetitio est mater memoriae!” Additionally, (and thankfully!) we classical teachers are an extremely patient … Continue reading

Posted in Aquinas, Augustine, Lord's Prayer, Temptation, The Passion | Tagged , , | 15 Comments

Easter 2019! Boeuf en Croute Alleluia!

Easter came a little later this year, but as a good friend likes to remind me, God is seldom early but He is never late! I am not sure how true this is, but it does seem to describe pretty well … Continue reading

Posted in beauty, breakfast, Dinner, Easter, Ex Umbris, Feasts, Fine Arts | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Tiny Catholic School Sues City to Protect Civil Rights and Religious Freedom

The Lord does work in mysterious ways! When I founded The Lyceum in 2003, along with a couple of other teachers, a handful of adventurous students and their daring parents, none of us ever envisioned that our small school would ever … Continue reading

Posted in aeschylus, catholic education, Herodotus, Religious Freedom | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

The Prodigal Son and The Prodigal Mind: Our Lord’s Parable for Educators

Our Lord’s parable about the man who had two sons, upon the younger of whom tradition has bestowed the sobriquet ‘prodigal,’  provides an excellent lesson for parents everywhere who are concerned about the education of their children. I have a … Continue reading

Posted in Ambrose, Augustine, Catena Aurea, college, education, liberal education, soul, truth for its own sake | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

St. John Henry Newman on Liberal Education: A Scandal

Saint John Henry Newman, speaking of the unique status of Western Civilization in the history of the world, emphatically asserts, I think it has a claim to be considered as the representative Society and Civilization of the human race, as … Continue reading

Posted in liberal education, Newman | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments